The Assam Garden (1985)

Deborah: It was a joy working on that movie. I adored it. I wanted it to go on forever.
Interviewer: Hard work in the garden, it looked?
Deborah: Oh my God, the garden and the weather and the rain and the mud and the hose pipes and the ruddy bananas.

1 day ago 17 notes

  Deborah and her pets (X)

  At Bassetts, the Mayfield house, permanent residents were Jason, the pedigree sealyham and the black cat, Peter Geekee, named after the cat in a classic radio series.
  Peter became the family’s unofficial air-raid warden when the dreaded V1 flying bombs were in the vicinity. His cat antennae warned him of their imminence long before mere humans got the signal, and he would come tearing into the house, his tail as rigid as a submarine’s periscope.
NB: This IS Jason

1 day ago 3 notes
21st
August
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Deborah and the publicity chores (5/X)
   “One was endlessly photographed by one’s swimming pool playing with the children. Or they’d say ‘Deborah Kerr keeps her cold cream in the fridge’, and there would be a picture of me putting it into the fridge. Well, that one hit all the magazines. In fact,” she added as an afterthought, “I did keep my cold cream in the refrigerator in hot weather.” (Deborah Kerr)

Deborah and the publicity chores (5/X)

   “One was endlessly photographed by one’s swimming pool playing with the children. Or they’d say ‘Deborah Kerr keeps her cold cream in the fridge’, and there would be a picture of me putting it into the fridge. Well, that one hit all the magazines. In fact,” she added as an afterthought, “I did keep my cold cream in the refrigerator in hot weather.” (Deborah Kerr)

1 day ago 3 notes

Deborah at home (X) - Pacific Palisades

"Almost no one does [hire a decorator] in England. At home we just take our time and put the heirlooms and antiques where they seem to please us most. Sometimes it takes ages to furnish a home. And I must admit some of them look rather dowdy, but at least they’re a true expression of the home owner’s taste." (Deborah Kerr)

"The conclusion that can be drawn about Deborah Kerr’s taste as reflected in her home is that it’s one of quiet refinement touched with the unpredictable.
In her living room, for example, the only two colors are grey and pale gold. The furniture consists of fine 18th century antiques. The couch and chairs are upholstered in gold brocade to match the draperies. The effect is restful and unobtrusive.
Round-the-world furnishings include wooden heads from the Congo, whale-oil lamps from a London antique shop, and Italian plaques.
The dining room table, supported by Prince of Wales feathers, was bought at auction. Gaudy blackamoor statues stand in indirectly lighted niches.
Deborah’s bedroom was a complete re-make job. A wall was knocked out for the sea-scape picture window.” (1950s press)

1 day ago 1 note
20th
August
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   “She is the least temperamental person I know — nothing ever seems to get her bad-tempered, and that’s quite a statement when one has known somebody for over twenty years. She’s a lovely person and a very great artist, because she never lets her feelings show; she may be tired, she may be thoroughly fed up with the whole thing, but this never comes over. She’s never late, she’s always there, and a perfectly professional person, which is more than one can say for lots of people, in any walk of life.” (Esmee Smythe, Deborah’s stand in)

   “She is the least temperamental person I know — nothing ever seems to get her bad-tempered, and that’s quite a statement when one has known somebody for over twenty years. She’s a lovely person and a very great artist, because she never lets her feelings show; she may be tired, she may be thoroughly fed up with the whole thing, but this never comes over. She’s never late, she’s always there, and a perfectly professional person, which is more than one can say for lots of people, in any walk of life.” (Esmee Smythe, Deborah’s stand in)

2 days ago 4 notes
20th
August
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Deborah and her pets (X)
   In 1942 she had a miniature sealyham called Dumpling, after the nickname ‘Dumps’ which Michael Powell had bestowed on her during her own ‘puppy-fat’ days. Dumpling died suddenly when very young and Deborah was inconsolable for weeks.NB: this is not Dumpling

Deborah and her pets (X)

   In 1942 she had a miniature sealyham called Dumpling, after the nickname ‘Dumps’ which Michael Powell had bestowed on her during her own ‘puppy-fat’ days. Dumpling died suddenly when very young and Deborah was inconsolable for weeks.
NB: this is not Dumpling

2 days ago 1 note
20th
August
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Deborah, about the theatre roles in the 70s:  “Finding a good part these days isn’t easy. Very few playwrights are writing for women.  That is unless you want to march around stark naked and I don’t, although, if I were 20 and looked gorgeous, I wouldn’t mind”

Deborah, about the theatre roles in the 70s:

  “Finding a good part these days isn’t easy. Very few playwrights are writing for women.
  That is unless you want to march around stark naked and I don’t, although, if I were 20 and looked gorgeous, I wouldn’t mind”

2 days ago
20th
August
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Deborah, at home (X) - Pacific Palisades
   “At first [when they came to America], Tony and I thought we were homesick, so we waited a decent interval for that to wear off. When it didn’t, we looked around for other causes for our moodiness.  The answer was so obvious we didn’t recognize it for months. It turned out to be a kind of homesickness after all, for we finally discovered that it was our rented house that was getting us down. You see, we were living in a small California bungalow in a narrow canyon. Nothing could have been more unlike our previous homes. The place was too new, the ceilings were too low, and the neighbors were too close.  I stood it as long as I could. Then I tearfully confessed to Tony that we’d have to go home to England if we didn’t move out of that trap.” (Deborah Kerr)  “One misty afternoon, they were driving through the Pacific Palisades, a part of Los Angeles which is near the beach and looks very much like the Italian Riviera.  Quite by chance the “homesick” pair noticed one house that was close to the road.   The two-story, white stucco house with its rain-washed red tile roof seemed to be waiting for them.The property that went with it was rich in perennial gardens, wide stretches of lawn, and eucalyptus trees. An eight-foot wall on the street front and a steep palisade down to the ocean gave the house the privacy and seclusion all Englishmen seem to require.” (1950s press)

Deborah, at home (X) - Pacific Palisades

   “At first [when they came to America], Tony and I thought we were homesick, so we waited a decent interval for that to wear off. When it didn’t, we looked around for other causes for our moodiness.
  The answer was so obvious we didn’t recognize it for months. It turned out to be a kind of homesickness after all, for we finally discovered that it was our rented house that was getting us down. You see, we were living in a small California bungalow in a narrow canyon. Nothing could have been more unlike our previous homes. The place was too new, the ceilings were too low, and the neighbors were too close.
  I stood it as long as I could. Then I tearfully confessed to Tony that we’d have to go home to England if we didn’t move out of that trap.” (Deborah Kerr)

  “One misty afternoon, they were driving through the Pacific Palisades, a part of Los Angeles which is near the beach and looks very much like the Italian Riviera.
  Quite by chance the “homesick” pair noticed one house that was close to the road. 
  The two-story, white stucco house with its rain-washed red tile roof seemed to be waiting for them.The property that went with it was rich in perennial gardens, wide stretches of lawn, and eucalyptus trees. An eight-foot wall on the street front and a steep palisade down to the ocean gave the house the privacy and seclusion all Englishmen seem to require.” (1950s press)

2 days ago 1 note

   “It’s a funny animal that camera, isn’t it? It sort of sees right into people and you can be acting that you’re not that kind of person, but you are.
   It sees through you.” (Deborah Kerr)

3 days ago 44 notes
19th
August
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The King and I (1956)   “I would like to state most emphatically that Mrs Anna is not a stuffy, dull, prissy woman. She’s a very wonderful, witty, warm, humorous, courageous woman. And that sounds good, doesn’t it?” (Deborah Kerr) 

The King and I (1956)

   “I would like to state most emphatically that Mrs Anna is not a stuffy, dull, prissy woman. She’s a very wonderful, witty, warm, humorous, courageous woman. And that sounds good, doesn’t it?” (Deborah Kerr)
 

3 days ago 26 notes
19th
August
4 notes
Reblog
Deborah, at home (X) - Mayfield, SussexThe outhouse was converted into a bar and the decoration completed with a swastika from a shot-down German bomber by Tony.

Deborah, at home (X) - Mayfield, Sussex

The outhouse was converted into a bar and the decoration completed with a swastika from a shot-down German bomber by Tony.

3 days ago 4 notes
19th
August
9 notes
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Deborah and her pets (X)  Deborah’s first own pet was Simon, a white Fox Terrier, given to her at the beginning of the war by her mother.   On 18 April, 1950, the car in which were her mother and the dog sitting in her lap was crushed in an accident. Colleen was killed instantly, and Simon, thrown high into the air by the impact of the blow, broke his spine. He was put to sleep instantly by a veterinary surgeon.NB: this is not Simon

Deborah and her pets (X)

  Deborah’s first own pet was Simon, a white Fox Terrier, given to her at the beginning of the war by her mother.
  On 18 April, 1950, the car in which were her mother and the dog sitting in her lap was crushed in an accident. Colleen was killed instantly, and Simon, thrown high into the air by the impact of the blow, broke his spine. He was put to sleep instantly by a veterinary surgeon.
NB: this is not Simon

3 days ago 9 notes

Deborah at the Oscars

4 days ago 3 notes

Deborah and her pets (X)

Deborah’s pets included a long line of dogs and cats over whom she was always “ridiculously sensitive and softhearted.”

4 days ago 3 notes

Deborah, at home (X) - Mayfield, Sussex

   “Her financial position had become stable enough in early February 1944 for her to buy herself a home of her own, after so many years in family and institutional backgrounds. It was at Tunbridge Wells, on the Kent-Sussex border, and consisted of two old farmhouses knocked together, with a beautiful garden — a ‘must’ in her scheme of things ever since the orchard at Pound Cottage in Alfold. As things turned out she was to enjoy less than two years there: the house was auctioned off in 1946.” (Eric Braun)

4 days ago 4 notes